Amorphous

Landscape has -we saw many images- a bit of an amorphous image. When people think about landscape they don’t think of rigor, of order, of a formal element but rather of something very free, wild and uncontrollable. (…) We never want to reproduce nature or a landscape but we always want to make clear what is tamed, that we use an aesthetic that always works with elements of the landscape -the reason for an “architectural landscape”. That’s why we also create spaces – elements of architecture, for example spaces, axes, points of high elevation, we create these elements in the landscape as architectural elements, but we always try to work with the contrast between plants and architecture.

Stephan Lenzen, Interview (2012) 7.04.01_Dyck_7 schloss-dyck-10049p44_grande_proyecto_04057Dyck-Castle-by-Stephan-Lenzen-01

p44_grande_proyecto_11 p44_grande_proyecto_10 065Stephan Lenzen + RMP Landschaftsarchitecten, New Gardens in the Dyck Field (2002)

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Amorphous

10 tips

1. Use a local problem to invent a generic solution. Though landscape architecture tends to be a custom job, it can still offer solutions for footloose phenomena. 2. Use a global challenge to solve a local problem. Global problems can have a major influence in landscape design. 3. Think big in small scale projects. Design solution often emerge in the bigger picture. 4. Think small and simple in big scale projects. On large scale and long term, it’s hardly possible to foresee the results of a design intervention. Still it’s vital to show how the future might look like. 5. Design total landscapes. If possible, ‘total design’ is very powerful and can overcome apparent contradictions. 6. Don’t design everything. The more you design, the less freedom there is left. 7. Aim for pure nature. Designed nature might never be ‘pure’ but can be overwhelmingly abundant, rich, exciting and fertile. 8. Make devices to experience nature. People need devices to experience nature; they bring binoculars, kites, bike, etc. Landscape architects should develop unique devices to enable that experience. 9. Trigger senses. Like most media, this book only shows the visual side of landscapes, while an intense landscape experience depends on all senses. 10. Make sense. Landscape architecture is about realizing ideas.

Lola Landscape Architecture, 10 tips for landscape architecture (2012)Park-Groot-Vijversburg08 Park-Groot-Vijversburg07

Park-Groot-Vijversburg06Park-Groot-Vijversburg05Park-Groot-Vijversburg09Park-Groot-Vijversburg01Park-Groot-Vijversburg10Park-Groot-Vijversburg02 Park-Groot-Vijversburg03

  Park-Groot-Vijversburg11 Park-Groot-Vijversburg12 Park-Groot-Vijversburg13Park-Groot-Vijversburg04Lola Landscape Architecture, Groot Vijversburg Park (2015)

10 tips

Prototype

The best place to visit Holland is Japan. Holland Village, in the outskirts of Nagasaki is a condensed scaled down version of the real thing. Or may be it is the other way round and Holland Village in Japan is actually the original that makes its European counterpart nothing more than an oversized, inflated and (quite literally) watered down version lacking the purity and essence of its prototype. (…)

The notion of the actual creation of land is the essence of Dutch Landscape architecture. Whilst in the Anglo Saxon world Landscape is first an foremost a visual representation and a mental construct wrapped into a wet blanket of subjectivity, for the Dutch landscape is about the phisical and rational manipulation of an objectified reality. The Dutch Landscape is an efficient livework unit while the British landscape architects can design gardens and cannot design landscapes while exactly the opposite holds true for their Dotch colleagues.

Dirk Sijmons, Architectura + Natura. = Landscape (1998)


jp-ngs-hollandvillage-b img_2393 amsterdam_2Nagasaki-Holland-Village

Holland Village, Nagasaki

Prototype

Effect

I have tried to represent a tempest, imitating, as best I could, the effect of violent wind, in air full of obscurity, rain, lightning and thunder, which break out in several places and produce great disturbance.” All the characters play their roles in harmony with the general action. Some go through the cloud of dust in the direction of the wind, and are carried along by it. Others, on the contrary, go against the wind and walk with great difficulty, putting hands before their eyes. At the left we notice a shepherd, who runs and leaves his flock on seeing a lion that, after he has thrown to the ground certain cowherds, attacks others, of whom some defend themselves, while the rest goad on their cattle and try to escape. A dog, at a little distance, is barking furiously and his hair stands on end, but he does not venture to come nearer. In the foreground is seen Pyramis, lying on the ground dead, and by his side Thisbe, who abandons herself to grief.

Nicolas Poussin, Letter to Jacques Stella (1651)

23 Poussin - Paesaggio con Piramo e Tisbe

Nicolas Poussin, Landscape with Pyramis and Thisbe (1651)

Effect

Here

The Landscape comes at us from every direction. It comes at us in every way, It rushes at our eyes, hurtling toward the retina… at the speed of the light. It batters at our ears, rattling down our ear canal… at the speed of sound. Inhale, and within a quartes of a second the landscape is at our olfactory bulb. Sometimes we have the feeling that the landscape is … out there, but it is not; it is in our eyes and ears, up our nose and down our throat. It rubs our feet and caresses our cheeks. When things are just right, it plays with our hair, tickles the back of our neck, sends shiversrunning up and down our spine. It is not out there anywhere; it is rigth here, in our face.

Denis Wood, The Spell of the Land (1995)

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Andrei Tarkovsky, Stalker (1979)

Here

Movement

Halprin_Score_Seminary_South_Foutain  halprin halprin secuencia In order to design for movement a whole new system of conceptualizing most be undertaken. Our present systems of design and planning are inevitabily limited by our techniques of conceptulizing and our methods of symbolizing ideas. We know only how to delineate static objects, and so is all we do.

Lawrence Halprin, Cities (1963)

Movement